Question: How many times do you set an anchor and fail before you say enough is enough and move on?

Answer: For this Miss and her Captain 5 times

It may seem like a fail but it wasn’t all bad.

Throughout the process of laying, raising and doing it all again, there was no foot stomping, crying or hairy eyeballs with lip pursed curses. In fact the entire process was calm and a matter of fact. This lack of stress is progress for the Miss Catana crew.

OK progress for me.

 

Of late we have been hassle free, as we lay that lump of strategically moulded metal that is attached to the grey length of chain that holds our life savings.  I  continue to marvel at our anchors holding ability, as well as my skill in trusting the process and being able to sleep at night. We use an anchor alarm, this is probably why I am able to shut my eyes and drift off…even if the alarm is a greedy battery charge eating device, it’s worth it.

 

You Can’t Deny Setting an Anchor Is A Spectator Sport

As anchoring can be such a pain it appears to me that the majority of sailors watch, take note and have a keen interest in what’s going on, as a new neighbour comes in to moor. Consideration such as how close is too close, what’s the wind doing and what direction is it pushing the boat, particularly when it comes to stern anchoring (laying anchoring and backing into into the parking space) and where are the other anchors are  in relation to your own  descending anchor. I know if you are there first, you have a right to ask a newbie to pull up and move on if you feel their boat puts your boat at risk. I am dreading this moment when we have the right to ask another boat to bugger off to some place else…. I have been warned in summer time Italians cause major grief when it comes to anchoring, however as yet I have no proof if this is true. I will keep you posted and hope I don’t offend any Italian reading this.

People are more than generous in assisting others dock their boats, its when the anchor goes down in open water that the fun begins.

our anchor spot

When we first arrived it was busy, so unlike Baby the Captain moved Miss Catana into the corner.

 

 

Only a few days ago we watched another boat lay anchor twice, they got it right on the third attempt.

I think our 5 attempts makes us the anchor winner (loser) doesn’t it??

 

The Days Are Long In The Mediterranean Summer

We were awake pre dawn, which was prior to 6 am, as this day was always going to be a  long leg. Our final day’s destination was unknown, it would be as far as the light, wind and our trusty steed was able to take us. We plan to have a few days in Athens prior to meeting our friends in Mykonos, so lounging around on Greek islands in the Ionian Sea for a couple of weeks was enjoyable but has distracted us from the task at hand.

beach in meganisi

When on the island of Meganisi we spent some of our time at this bay.

 

It was approximately 8 pm as we entered the bay, wind gusts were around 19 knots and the sun was low in the sky. We still had ample amounts of time. The Rod Heikell guide shared that the the bottom was weedy and may be tricky to get a hold, yet perseverance was rewarded. We did connect strongly with the sand on our fifth attempt yet the success was short lived. The Captain thought Miss Catana was now too close to another boat and the rocky shore. Time to move once again.

 

 

I convinced he who must be obeyed, when considering the safety of the boat, to try going inside the old marina to find a berth.

Bad Bad Idea.

Once inside we were greeted by a sunken ketch with little room for manoeuvre, certainly no room for our Miss Catana. With as much grace as one can, we exited the bay and moved on to find a new place to anchor.  We chose Eratini a bay about an hour away that had wonderful shelter from the westerly winds, and best of all we had the entire bay to ourselves. Yes it was dark when we got in, but assisted by the full moon and the twinkling village lights we had more than enough light to get ourselves settled for the evening.

From Most Fails Good Things Come

The next morning, Sunday, our boat was moored directly opposite the local church, we were in prime position for hearing the bells and full mass.  The new day revealed a quaint town with friendly locals who were impressed that Australians had ventured into their bay.

 

There Was Much To The Day Besides Anchoring

The below video is a recap of the day from start to finish, includes going under the world’s largest cable bridge. It was a pretty cool thing to do, unlike the above cars we didn’t have to pay 15 euro for the privilege. The weather was warm, when the wind came late morning it stayed. Very nice.

Thanks for watching and cheers

the Miss

PS A question to experienced readers, is 5 attempts, without lasting success, demonstrates perseverance, or just bad seamanship or (bad luck on our behalf)?

 

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